6 Quick Tips for Social Media Success

The link-bait title is only half tongue-in-cheek.

Last night I attended a great little seminar on improving business-to-business social media use run by Bath and Bristol Marketing Network [I cheated a little – it’s a network for “marketing professionals” rather than “marketing amateurs”]. The speakers were Noisy Little Monkey – a digital marketing agency [who I now respect even more knowing they have an office in Shepton Mallet].

The main points that filtered through my fatigued post-5.30pm brain were:

  1. Identify your audience.
  2. Use images/graphics as well as text.
  3. Plan, test, measure, evaluate, repeat.
  4. Social media is not about conversion
  5. Identify the Twitter geeks who are going to push your content.
  6. Use editorial and event calendars to generate a content plan for a year.
Social Media Drives Growth!
Social Media Drives Growth!
CC: mkhmarketing

Here’s some more detail:

Identify your audience

  • Even better, categorise it.
  • Identify 5-10 groups and write a half-page “persona” for each group.
  • E.g. Michael Smith – manager of a software company – 45 – lives in Hereford with 2 kids.
  • Bear these “personas” in mind when writing content.

Use images/graphics as well as text

Plan, test, measure, evaluate, repeat

  • The tools are there – e.g. X Analytics, Twitter analysis tools like FollowerWonk etc. – build evidence and base strategy on it.
  • Prepare a monthly report that gives traffic/demographic/content statistics.
  • Systematically experiment with variations on format and content and use the above statistics to evaluate. E.g. What topics pique interest? Do images actually make a difference to engagement and sharing?

Social media is not about conversion

  • Sales come from phone calls, website visits, face-to-face encounters. Social media is the noise that pushes people into the sales funnel. It does work.
  • That said the pressure on pushy sales is removed.
  • Educating and entertaining become more important.

Identify the Twitter geeks who are going to push your content

  • As in most things, only 1-5% of a group actually drives conversations.
  • For example, on Twitter there are key individuals that are followed by many – if you were looking to get exposure work out what they like and what makes them tick. Find out what their interests are to aim content at them for retweets, comments and blog conversations.
  • You can identify individuals using tools – you can sort by individuals who have a large number of followers in areas you operate in who are likely to retweet URLs.

Use editorial and event calendars to generate a content plan for a year

  • You might know when IP events are going to be held. You might know when technology events are to be held. You can  plan your content (e.g. blog posts) around these.
  • Also you can find out magazine and newspaper editorial calendars (just google “magazine name” + “editorial calendar”) – you can have a yearly plan of when articles are published and fit blog articles into this.

Social Media Management for Law Firms

So. You are part of a law firm. You need a little organisation for your “social media” presence. Here is a little guide setting out one way to do this based on my experience with my personal accounts.

8519896_s

There are probably better guides out there. Also this probably applies to non-law firms as much as law firms. However, the perspective of someone who has played around with it may be useful.

In the past I used TweetDeck. However, this is now largely decommissioned, having been assimilated into Twitter. The only real alternative I have found that is reasonably-priced and meets all the basic requirements is Hootsuite. It costs around £90/year for the “Pro” package.

What Do You Mean By “Social Media”?

“Social Media” is the trendy buzzword for a handful of “social” websites and web services. Here “social” generally means “communication between people”; it is a combination of publication and comment.

In my case “social media” refers to at least the following:

  • Twitter;
  • LinkedIn; and
  • Google+.

The unmentioned one is Facebook. This may be a bit too “social” for a law firm (although has possibilities from a recruitment perspective).

How Should I Setup Hootsuite?

After you have signed-up and paid for Hootsuite, log-in. The first step is then to setup your law firm as an “organization”. To do this follow the guide here: https://help.hootsuite.com/entries/21678723-creating-an-organization. For “organization name” I add the name of the law firm. As I am “on brand” I also add a firm logo. Leave the “add social networks” for now: we will do that later.

Once you have added the “organization” you should be able to see it when you click on the top menu button on the left-hand side menu bar. To add other people as managers and social networks click on the “Manage” button within the “organization” pane.

Adding Social Networks

On the right-hand-side of the lower pane there should be an “Add a Social Network” button. Use this to add accounts from the social networks discussed above. This typically requires you authorising yourself with each network so make sure you have your usernames and passwords handy.

After adding each social network select the next icon down in the left-hand side menu bar (“Streams”). Click on the little “+” icon at the top to add a new set of columns/streams (a “tab”).

At the moment I have one tab per social network/network feed. After adding the tab select the required social network from the dropdown box in the first “Add a stream” column that appears.

For Twitter my recommended streams are:

  • Home,
  • Mentions,
  • Retweets,
  • DMs, and
  • Sent Tweets.

If you want you can add all streams but five streams fit well across my monitor (you can use the little slider bar in the top right to reduce the number of columns/streams per tab).

For LinkedIn you are limited to “Company Updates” and “Scheduled Status Updates”.  For Google+, “Home”, “Sent Messages” and “Scheduled Messages” are options.

Now you can see all of your social media feeds in one handy place. You can also now post to any one of the added networks including the use of the “auto-scheduling” feature.

RSS to Update

A clever little feature of Hootsuite is that you can pipe an RSS/Atom feed through to a social network. Hence, if you have a blog you can automatically tweet new entries or post these to LinkedIn.

To set this up go to the cog (“Settings”) within the left-hand side menu. Choose the “RSS/Atom” option. Click on the “+” to add a new feed. Type in the URL of your blog (e.g. of your firm). Select a social media network to post to and set various frequency settings. Save and leave. Hey presto.

Further Lessons

Following these basics, the next stage is build a team and use search and assignment functions to get active. But that is the subject of another day’s post.

Any other tips please feel free to add to the comments.