Archive for the ‘Practical Tips’ Category

Finding a good patent attorney (or patent client) is a lot like dating.

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Once upon a time, dates were centred around [the golf course / an elite educational establishment alumni group / the locker room / a City gentleman’s club]* (delete as appropriate).

Dates were also primarily a male affair. Typically among greying men in suits and ties.

However, we now live in the 21st century. We have at our disposal the data to make much better matches.

Finding Companies

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There are several free public lists you can use to find companies. These include:

From these lists you can collate a large list of companies that may or may not require intellectual property services. I prefer a long CSV list with no fancy formatting.

Matching by Technology

Most companies specialise in particular areas of technology. Likewise, most patent attorneys have specific experience in certain technologies. A good technology match saves time and money.

One way to match by technology is to use the International Patent Classification.

If you have lots of time (or a work experience student or a Mechanical Turk) you can take each company from your list, one-by-one, and perform a search on EspaceNet. You can then look through the results and make a note of the classifications of the patent applications returned from the search.

If you have no time, but a geeky interest in Python, you can automate this using the excellent EPO Online Patent Services.

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Through a few hacky functions (which can be found on GitHub), you can:

  • Iterate through a large list of companies / applicants;
  • Clean the company / applicant name to ensure relevant search results;
  • Process the search results to extract the classifications;
  • Process the search results to determine the patent agent of record;
  • Process the classifications to build up a technology profile for each company / applicant; and
  • Process the classifications to rank companies / applicants within a particular technology area.

For example, say you are a patent attorney with 20 years worth of experience in organic macromolecular compounds or centrifugal apparatus. Who would you look at helping? How about:

classification-filter_2016-10-27

Or say you wanted to know what technology areas Company X worked in? How about:

classifications_2016-10-26

(* Quiz: any idea who this may be? Guesses in the comments…)

Or say you work for Company X and you wonder which patent attorneys work for your competitors or in a particular technology area. How about:

agents_2016-10-25_20-18-18

From here?

By improving matching, e.g. between companies and patent attorneys, we can open up legal services. As the potential of technology grows, legal service provision need not be limited to a small pool of ad-hoc connections. Companies can get a better price by looking outside of expensive traditional patent centres. Work product can be improved as those with the experience and passion for a particular area of technology can be matched with companies that feel the same.

As you work as a patent attorney you meet many small to medium enterprises (SMEs – businesses with under 250 employees – also known as “small entities” in the US). Everyone has a different level of knowledge, and some companies are unaware of how they can get a better deal. To remedy this, here is my guide to commissioning patent work.

Light on an important subject
The advice is roughly split into the following areas:

  • Use competition to your advantage;
  • Prepare to better use your time;
  • Meet the people doing the work;
  • Look for a commercial and technical fit;
  • Agree on costs and timings in advance; and
  • Agree on workflow in advance.

Use competition to your advantage 

Patent firms (at least in the UK) will offer a free 30-minute consultation to potential new clients. Patent firms do this to get new business. It is often recommended to meet at least three firms to compare costs, people and approach. This means you can get up to 1.5 hours of free legal advice.

You can create a shortlist by looking for local patent firms. For SMEs, local firms (i.e. outside of London) are often a better fit on price and people, and organising company visits is easier. Many university cities have patent law firms, so a good play to start is to pick your nearest and search the Internet for “patent firm [nearest city]”. Have a look at the firms’ websites. You can normally get a feel for the size of a firm and their area(s) of expertise from their website.

If you are in a main patent hub (e.g. London or Munich), look for firms involved in activities that over lap with yours, e.g. firms that have talked at a nearby incubator or known industry group.

Firms are often split into four or so subject areas: pharma & biotech; chemistry; mechanical / heavy engineering; and IT & electronics. Many firms are better in one of these areas and weaker in others. Look for numbers of attorneys, their backgrounds and mentions of key clients to work out strengths and weaknesses. Try to shortlist firms with a strong practice group in your area of business.

Arrange meetings with your shortlist of firms by email or phone.

Prepare to better use your time

Ahead of your initial meetings, there is some preliminary work you can do to maximise your free legal advice and test your prospective firms. This often needs to be an hour or so of preparation: one page of A4 is about right.

First, attempt to write down why you need patent services. Do this in plain English. For example:

  • I need to stop my competitors doing X.
  • I have a new product that in launching in two months. We have spent Y on R&D.
  • We need investment. We have seed/series A/series B funding. We are looking at acquisition in as an exit in two to three years.
  • We have a few patents. We wish to monetise our portfolio.

Information that is useful to a patent attorney includes:

  • Your key markets (current and future);
  • Where you manufacture;
  • Your competitors (and their key markets / places of manufacture);
  • Your launch schedule; and
  • Your general business direction over the next 5-10 years (at a brief, high level).

If you have this information in pre-existing material (e.g. an investor or shareholder pack), you can provide this ahead of your meeting. It is worth keeping this high level and keeping as much as possible to publicly known details.

If you have a new product or idea, it may also be worth doing an hour or so of Internet searching and selecting the three most relevant finds. These may be supplied ahead of your meeting (e.g. send three URLs with brief notes – “This blog post describes something similar to the first step”).

If you can send this information, in confidence, ahead of your meeting then it is likely your prospective patent firms will do at least an additional 30 minutes of preparation before your meeting, and you will get better advice to compare. It also frees up time in the meeting to discuss strategy rather than go over these points. If you prefer not to send confidential details ahead of time, take your page of A4 as a meeting prompt.

Meet the people doing the work

A traditional way of law firms acquiring new clients is as follows:

  1. Prospective client meets charismatic partner at an event / on the golf course;
  2. A meeting is arranged with law firm via charismatic partner, who attends;
  3. The work starts and charismatic partner vaporises – a series of unknown associates impersonally deal with the work.

There is nothing necessarily malicious in this, some partners are better at sales, associates often do a bulk of the work due to the “leverage” model of law firms. It can, however, leave a bad taste if unexpected.

One way to avoid this is to ask to meet all those who will be potentially working with the company. Most patent firms should be happy to oblige. Be a little wary of those that refuse.

Look for a commercial and technical fit

A perfect technical match may be difficult to find. If there is a perfect match, there is often a conflict, e.g. the firm may work for one of your competitors. If you need to discuss sensitive commercial details in your initial meeting, you may wish to ask the patent firms you are meeting to perform a conflict check and confirm there is no conflict *before* you meet (or before you send them non-public information).

Sometimes you may get lucky and a technical fit may exist due to a recent client change (e.g. a past client was acquired and the work was moved to the patent firm of the parent company). This is probably the exception rather than the rule.

For a general technical fit look for:

  • Patent attorneys with a technical degree in your area of technology;
  • Current or recent experience in a neighbouring non-competing field;
  • Familiarity with at least general core concepts of your technology (if not your particular niche); and
  • Rapid understanding.

For a commercial fit look for:

  • Experience of similar size companies (e.g. revenue-wise) ;
  • Experience with your business model (e.g. software licensing vs. chemical manufacturing); and
  • General knowledge of your industry and market (e.g. at a Bloomberg, Economist or FT level).

Look for those that listen.

Agree on costs and timings in advance 

When you are obtaining cost estimates ask for prospective costs over the next year. Also ask to identify one or two key billing points over the year for costs to be charged.

An often heard criticism from companies is the stream of small bills from patent firms after a particular piece of work has been done. This is often due to the nature of the hourly billing module – small bits of work are often needed after an event of when miscellaneous communications arrive. Firms also wish to avoid having unpaid work sitting on their systems. One way to avoid this is to either include small future predictable costs in initial charges (firms often avoid doing this as it raises their estimates in comparison with other firms) or to have agreed billing points. For example, filing an application and filing a response are two normal billing points – you can ask that all others charges are also billed at these points with the substantive work.

Companies should also ask for caps or fixed prices for the work. Most patent firms should oblige if these are reasonable. This makes costs more predictable for the company, avoids surprise charges and often gets them a better deal.

Agree on workflow in advance

Patent attorneys charge for their time. Companies thus have a trade-off when commissioning patent work: they can save their time (e.g. engineer or C-level time) at the expense of higher patent attorney charges; or they can agree to do more on their end to save patent attorney costs.

For example, one substantial part of responding to examination reports is reviewing the cited prior art (typically 2-4 20-50 page patent publications). If a company wish to save on patenting costs, they can perform this work in-house (e.g. make it part of an engineer role). If a company provides guidance on differences and advantages (even if these are not put in legal terms), they can negotiate lower charges for responding to an examination report. If, on the other hand, engineer time is at a premium, they may ask that the patent attorney provides options or a proposal for their review (this should be provided at an executive summary level).

Similarly, to avoid drift, loss of momentum or extra charges, a timescale for work on both ends should be agreed at a high level. For example, it may be agreed that a draft will take 4 weeks to prepare and that engineers will review within 1 or 2 weeks of receipt. Similarly, it may be agreed that all official communications and filings are to be reported with 5 working days, or that engineers need 4 weeks to review cited prior art.

It is also a good idea to agree who is going to be the main point of communication on both sides, and whether any additional stakeholders need to be cc-ed by default (e.g. engineering managers, directors, secretaries, etc.).

This should not take too long to work out (e.g. a 30 min phonecall or a quick email exchange) but it pays dividends later on in the relationship (and avoids “surprise” charges cropping up).

This is a question that has been on my mind for a while. The answer I normally get is: “well, you just kind of know don’t you?” This isn’t very useful for anyone. The alternative is: “it depends”. Again, not very useful. Can we think of any way to at least try to answer the question? (Even if the answer is not perfect.)

The question begets another: “how do we measure success?”


For a company this may be:

  • the broadest, strongest patent (or patent portfolio) obtained at the lowest cost;
  • a patent or patent portfolio that covers their current and future products, and that reduces their UK tax bill; and/or
  • a patent or patent portfolio that gets the company what it asks for in negotiations with third parties.

For an in-house attorney or patent department this may be:

  • meeting annual metrics, including coming in on budget;
  • a good reputation with the board of directors or the C-suite; and/or
  • no surprises.

For an inventor this may be:

  • minimum distruption to daily work;
  • respect from peers in the technology field; and/or
  • recognition (monetary or otherwise) for their hard work.

For a patent firm this may be:

  • a large profit;
  • high rankings in established legal publications; and/or
  • a good reputation with other patent firms and prospective or current clients.

For a partner of a patent firm this may be:

  • a large share of the profit divided by time spent in the office; and/or
  • a low blood pressure reading.

As we can see, metrics of success may vary between stakeholders. However, there do appear to be semi-universal themes:

  1. Low cost (good for a company, possibly bad for patent attorneys);
  2. Minimal mistakes (good for everyone);
  3. Timely actions (good for everyone but sometimes hard for everyone); and
  4. High legal success rate (good for everyone).

High legal success rate (4) may include high numbers of:

  • Case grants (with the caveat that the claims need to be of a good breadth);
  • Cases upheld on opposition (if defending);
  • Cases revoked on opposition (if opposing);
  • Oral hearings won; and
  • Court cases won.

I will investigate further how these can be measured in practice in a future post. I add the caveat that this is not an exhaustive list, however, rather than do nothing out of the fear of missing something, I feel it is better to do something, in full knowledge I have missed things but that these can be added on iteration.

Cost is interesting, because we see patent firms directly opposed to their clients. Their clients (i.e. companies) typically wish to minimise costs and patent firms wish to maximise profits, but patent firm profits are derived from client costs. For patent firms (as with normal companies), a client with a high profit margin is both an asset and a risk; the risk being that a patent firm of a similar caliber (e.g. with approximately equal metrics for 2-4 above) could pitch for work with a reduced (but still reasonable) profit margin. In real life there are barriers to switching firms, including the collective knowledge of the company, its products and portfolio, and social relationships and knowledge. However, everything has a price; if costs are too high and competing firms price this sunk knowledge into their charging, it is hard to reason against switching.

There is a flip side for patent firms. If they can maximise 2-4, they can rationalise higher charges; companies have a choice if they want to pay more for a firm that performs better.

On cost there is also a third option. If patent firms have comparative values for 2-4, and they wish to maintain a given profit margin, they can reduce costs through efficiencies. For most patent firms, costs are proportional to patent attorney time, reduce the time it takes to do a job and costs reduce. The question is then: how to reduce time spent on a matter while maintaining high quality, timeliness and success? This is where intelligence, automation and strategy can reap rewards.

In-house, the low cost aim still applies, wherein for a department cost may be measured in the number of patent attorneys that are needed or outside-counsel spend, as compared to a defined budget.

In private practice, and especially in the US, we often see an inverse of this measurement: a “good” patent attorney (from a patent firm perspective) is someone who maximises hourly billings, minimises write-downs, while anecdotally maintaining an adequate level for 2-4. One problem is maximising hourly billings often leads to compromise on at least 2 and 3; large volumes of work, long hours, and high stress are often not conducive to quality work. This is why I have an issue with hourly billing. A base line is that a profit per se is required, otherwise the business would not be successful. Further, a base line of profit can be set, e.g. allowing for a partner salary of X-times the most junior rate, an investment level of Y%, a bonus pool for extra work performed etc.. However, beyond that, the level of profit is a factor to maximise, subject to constraints, i.e. 1-4 above, where the constraints take priority. The best solution is to align profit with the constraints, such that maximising 1-4 maximises profit. That way everyone benefits. How we can do this will be the subject of a future post.

So, let’s return to our original question: what makes a good patent attorney?

From the above, we see it is a patent attorney that at least makes minimal mistakes, operates in a timely manner, has a high legal success rate and provides this at a low cost. In private practice, it is also a patent attorney that aligns profit with these measures.

One thing I have been trying to do recently is to connect together a variety of information sources. This has inevitably involved Python.

Estonian Snake Pipe by Diego Delso, Wikimedia Commons, License CC-BY-SA 3.0

Estonian Snake Pipe by Diego Delso, Wikimedia Commons, License CC-BY-SA 3.0

Due to the Windows-centric nature of business software, I have also needed to setup Python on a Windows machine. Although setting up Python is easy on a Linux machine it is a little more involved for Windows (understatement). Here is how I did it.

  • First, download and install one of the Python Windows installers from here. As I am using several older modules I like to work with version 2.7 (the latest release is 2.7.8).
  • Second, if connecting to a Microsoft SQL database, install the Python ODBC module. I downloaded the 32-bit version for Python 2.7 from here.
  • Third, I want to install IPython as I find a notebook is the best way to experiment. This is a little long-winded. Download the ez_install.py script as described and found here. I downloaded into my Python directory. Next run the script from the directory (e.g. python ez_setup.py). Then add the Python scripts directory to your Environmental Variables as per here. Then install IPython using the command: easy_install ipython[all].
  • Fourth, download a Windows installer for Numpy and Pandas from here. I downloaded the 32-bit versions for Python 2.7. Run the installers.

Doing this I can now run a iPython notebook (via the command: ipython notebook – this will open a browser window for your default browser). I found Pandas gave me an error on the initial import as dateutil was missing – this was fixed by running the command: easy_install python-dateutil.

Now the aim is to connect the European Patent Office’s databases of patent and legal information to internal SQL databases and possibly external web-services such as the DueDil API

 

 

If you are looking for some data to help with marketing efforts Google Trends can be useful.

http://www.google.co.uk/trends/explore

For example, you can play with terms to work out areas of rising interest and direct blog posts and tweets in that direction. It can also provide a guide to the terms non-professionals use.

For example, I work in intellectual property. In this field talking about “protecting ideas” would likely get you more interest/exposure than talking about protecting “innovations” or “inventions” or “patents” specifically.

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Similarly, talking about “Brands” would likely get you more interest/exposure than talking about “Trademarks”.

IMG_0178.PNG

Have a play and let me know if you come up with any interesting insights.

The amazing @PatentSecretary has made my day by sending me a link on how to remove multiple authors from Track Changes Word documents.

This has been a pain for a while now. Firstly, Word sometimes suffers from bouts of multiple personality disorder, imagining me to be several individuals with the same name but with different Track Changes colours. Secondly, it is a pain when working in teams on a document for external use or review. It also doesn’t help that useful features are shuffled around with each version update of Word.

The advice itself comes from this very useful article by Shauna Kelly. The  bit about removing author information is set out below:

Q: I want to send my document outside the company. I want to leave tracked changes in the document, but I don’t want anyone to see who made the tracked changes or when they were made. How do I do that?

Word 2002 and earlier

In Word 2002 and earlier, you can’t. The author (or reviewer) information and the date information are permanently attached to the revision when the revision was tracked. You can’t change them, even in macro code.

Word 2003

In Word 2003, Tools > Options > Security. Tick the box “Remove personal information from file properties on save.” In spite of the name, this does more than just remove information in the file properties. If this box is ticked, Word removes the name of the author of a tracked change, and it removes the date and time that the change was made when you save your document. But it leaves the tracked change itself. All tracked changes and comments will be now attributed to an anonymous “Author”.

In Word 2007 and Word 2010

For one document at a time, you can remove the personal information about tracked changes. To do that:

  • In Word 2007: Round Office button > Prepare > Inspect Document > Inspect.
  • *In Word 2010: File > Info > Check for Issues > Inspect Document > Inspect.*

After the Inspector does its thing, you will see several ‘Remove All’ buttons.

  • The Remove All button for Comments, Revisions etc removes comments and accepts all tracked changes.
  • *The Remove All button for Document Properties and Personal Information just assigns the name “Author” to your tracked changes, and removes the date and time the tracked change. This is the one you need if you want to retain the tracked changes, but remove the author’s name and the date and time the tracked change was made.*

The Remove All button for Document Properties and Personal Information sets the ‘Remove personal information from file properties on save’ option for the document. So next time you save, your name will again be removed from tracked changes. If you don’t want that, then:

  • In Word 2010 do File > Info. In the ‘Prepare for Sharing’ section you will now see a note telling you that personal information will be removed on save. Click ‘Allow this information to be saved in your file’ to turn the setting off.
  • In Word 2007 and Word 2010 you can turn off this option in the Privacy Settings in the Trust Center. The option is greyed out and disabled unless (a) you have a document created in an earlier version of Word that used this setting or (b) you run the Document Inspector from the File (or Office Button) menu and choose to remove Document Properties and Personal Information.

The link-bait title is only half tongue-in-cheek.

Last night I attended a great little seminar on improving business-to-business social media use run by Bath and Bristol Marketing Network [I cheated a little – it’s a network for “marketing professionals” rather than “marketing amateurs”]. The speakers were Noisy Little Monkey – a digital marketing agency [who I now respect even more knowing they have an office in Shepton Mallet].

The main points that filtered through my fatigued post-5.30pm brain were:

  1. Identify your audience.
  2. Use images/graphics as well as text.
  3. Plan, test, measure, evaluate, repeat.
  4. Social media is not about conversion
  5. Identify the Twitter geeks who are going to push your content.
  6. Use editorial and event calendars to generate a content plan for a year.
Social Media Drives Growth!

Social Media Drives Growth!
CC: mkhmarketing


Here’s some more detail:

Identify your audience

  • Even better, categorise it.
  • Identify 5-10 groups and write a half-page “persona” for each group.
  • E.g. Michael Smith – manager of a software company – 45 – lives in Hereford with 2 kids.
  • Bear these “personas” in mind when writing content.

Use images/graphics as well as text

Plan, test, measure, evaluate, repeat

  • The tools are there – e.g. X Analytics, Twitter analysis tools like FollowerWonk etc. – build evidence and base strategy on it.
  • Prepare a monthly report that gives traffic/demographic/content statistics.
  • Systematically experiment with variations on format and content and use the above statistics to evaluate. E.g. What topics pique interest? Do images actually make a difference to engagement and sharing?

Social media is not about conversion

  • Sales come from phone calls, website visits, face-to-face encounters. Social media is the noise that pushes people into the sales funnel. It does work.
  • That said the pressure on pushy sales is removed.
  • Educating and entertaining become more important.

Identify the Twitter geeks who are going to push your content

  • As in most things, only 1-5% of a group actually drives conversations.
  • For example, on Twitter there are key individuals that are followed by many – if you were looking to get exposure work out what they like and what makes them tick. Find out what their interests are to aim content at them for retweets, comments and blog conversations.
  • You can identify individuals using tools – you can sort by individuals who have a large number of followers in areas you operate in who are likely to retweet URLs.

Use editorial and event calendars to generate a content plan for a year

  • You might know when IP events are going to be held. You might know when technology events are to be held. You can  plan your content (e.g. blog posts) around these.
  • Also you can find out magazine and newspaper editorial calendars (just google “magazine name” + “editorial calendar”) – you can have a yearly plan of when articles are published and fit blog articles into this.

A while back we looked at using “Assigned Tasks” to send tasks to other people.

This previous technique required the recipient to manage their own tasks. This may not be great if the recipient is over-loaded. It also does not allow the sender of the task to change the task properties (e.g. change priority to urgent or move to another date).

There is another way to manage people using Outlook tasks. This is by using shared tasks. How to do this is explained below.

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Setup a Shared Folder – Managee Computer

We will assume the person you want to manage is a “managee”. These steps need to be performed on the managee’s computer.

  1. Click on “Tasks” at the bottom of Outlook.
  2. Click on the “Tasks” entry in the left-hand-side menu.
  3. Click on the “Folder” tab at the top of the tasks view.
  4. Click on “Folder Permissions” (second to last entry).
  5. Click “Add”.
  6. Select everyone you want as a “manager” and click “OK”.
  7. Select the “Author” permission from the dropdown list and click “OK”.

Setup a Shared Folder – Manager Computer

You need to perform the following steps on the computer(s) of those who want to manage the managee.

  1. Click on “Tasks” at the bottom of Outlook.
  2. Click on the “Folder” tab at the top of the tasks view.
  3. Click “Open Shared Tasks” (third to last entry).
  4. Type the name of the managee or select from the list that appears when you select the “Name…” button.
  5. The managee’s tasks should then appear in a folder with their name under a “Shared Folders” heading on the left-hand-side.

Managing

Adding tasks for the managee:

  1. On the manager’s computer, go to “Tasks” in Outlook.
  2. Select the folder with the managee’s name.
  3. Then select “New Task” from the top.
  4. The added task will now appear in the “Tasks” list on the managee’s computer.
  5. It is recommend to add a “Category” that says who added the task – this will help the managee filter by sender.

On the managee’s side:

  1. If they go to “Tasks” in Outlook and select the “To-Do List” view (red flag) from the “Home” top menu they can see all tasks due in the future and past in a handy to-do list.
  2. The managee can then concentrate on doing the tasks due under the “Today” section (or those in the past).

The manager can now, via Outlook on their computer, edit existing tasks. For example:

  1. On the manager’s computer, go to “Tasks” in Outlook.
  2. Select the folder with the managee’s name.
  3. View the “To-Do List” for the selected folder.
  4. Double click a task to edit or delete (this will only work for tasks created by the manager).

Tasks can be reassigned to a different date, can be changed priority, can have notes added  etc..

Hide Private Tasks

If the managee is using tasks and does not want these viewable by everyone (e.g. “walk dog”, “pick up crack pipe” etc.) we need to create a private folder.

  1. Click on “Tasks” at the bottom of Outlook.
  2. Click on the “Folder” tab at the top of the tasks view.
  3. Click “New Folder” and call this “Private Tasks”.
  4. On the “Home” tab select “Simple List” in the “Current View”, select all existing tasks (using SHIFT) the click “Move” button (to the right) and select the “Private Tasks” folder.
  5. New private tasks should then be added to the “Private Tasks” folder (by selecting it on the left-hand-side before adding a task).

Let me know if you find any tricks or alternatives.

This is hopefully a solution to a problem that has driven me mad for years.

When attaching PDF documents you often see errors from patent online filing software. For PCT applications a usual one is that a set of PDF Figures are not ‘Annex F compliant’ or the page numbers are not calculated properly.

One way around this is to use the Amyuni PDF printer driver that is supplied with the European Patent Office online filing software. However, this also tends to garble a PDF document .

I think there is another, better way:
– Choose to print the document.
– Select an AdobePDF ‘printer’ (assuming you have an Acrobat print driver installed).
– Select the ‘properties’ of this printer.
– Where it says “Default Settings” change “Standard” to one of the “PDF/A” options.
– Also, while you are here, click the “Paper/Quality” tab and select “Black & White”.
– Click OK and print.
The document should then print (better than the Amyuni driver). You should then be able to upload it without errors and it should pass the online filing validation checks. 

AdobeError2

 

Update: My US colleagues advise that for US Patent Office compliance CutePDF is recommend – http://www.cutepdf.com/ .

On official communications from the European Patent Office (EPO) the application number is listed in the form: 13123456.9.

However, to search for this patent application on the European Register you need to use:  EP13123456 – i.e. you need to add EP and remove the check digit.  

This is often a pain. It is especially a pain if you have performed optical character recognition on a scanned-in communication. In this case you cannot copy the application number directly from the PDF into the European Register search bar.

A quick solution (until the EPO fix it): this little bit of HTML and Javascript.

<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html>
<head>
<meta charset="utf-8">
<title>EP Quick Search</title>

<script>
function changeNumber()
{
	var n = document.getElementById("number");
	var number = n.value;
	var start = "EP";
	var end_of_num = number.length-2;
	number = start.concat(number.substring(0, end_of_num));
	url = "https://register.epo.org/application?number=";
	url = url.concat(number, "&tab=main");
	window.open(url, '_blank')
}
</script>
</head>

<body>
<input type="textbox" id="number" value=""/>
<button onclick="changeNumber()">GO!</button>
</body>
</html>

Save this as an HTML file on your computer and add it as a favourite. Now just paste the application number in the box and search!

[To do – extend to GB and WO online patent registers.]